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Safety Center

Keeping Kids Safe

Electricity is a powerful energy, traveling 186,000 miles per second, and it always tries to reach the ground. Materials such as rubber, plastics, porcelain, wood (when dry) and glass stop the flow of electricity and generally prevent it from reaching the ground. These materials are called "insulators." On the other hand, "conductors" allow electricity to flow through them. Examples include metal, water, trees, most earth and skin.

There is a good chance that while you may know this information, your child does not. Part of keeping your child safe is educating him or her about the danger of misusing electricity and electrical devices.

Infants and Toddlers

  • Place safety covers over unused electric outlets. These insulators prevent electric shock.
  • Make sure your child does not stick his/her finger (or any other object) into an electrical outlet.
  • Do not let your child play around outlets.
  • Never use an electric appliance when your child is taking a bath or when the child is wet.
  • Bring your child inside during a storm.
  • Do not give your child a bath during a storm.
  • Keep your child away from windows, water faucets, pipes and electrical outlets during a storm.
  • Do not let your child touch wires lying on the ground, or inside the house.
  • Make sure your child keeps balloons, kites and other toys away from overhead lines.

Kids 3-6

  • Place safety covers over unused electric outlets.
  • Do not let your child play around outlets.
  • Make sure your child does not stick his/her finger (or any other object) into an electrical outlet.
  • Teach your child that electric outlets can be dangerous.
  • Teach your child never to stick any object into an outlet.
  • Always plug in and unplug an appliance for your child.
  • Make sure electric appliances are at least 10 feet away from swimming pools.
  • Never use an electric appliance when your child is taking a bath or when the child is wet.
  • Make sure your child is inside during a storm.
  • Do not give your child a bath during a storm.
  • Keep your child away from windows, water faucets, pipes and electrical outlets during a storm.
  • Do not let your child swim during a thunderstorm.
  • Do not let your child touch wires lying on the ground, or inside the house.
  • Do not let your child play near utility poles, power lines nor the support wires on poles.
  • Make sure your child flies a kite in open areas.
  • Make sure your child only flies a kite in good weather and away from power lines.
  • Make sure your child's kite is made of wood, plastic or paper – never metal, foil or wire.
  • Make sure your child keeps balloons and other toys away from overhead lines.
  • Do not allow your child to play around substations, utility towers or transformers (green metal boxes) or where "Danger: High Voltage" signs are posted.

Kids 7-10

  • Teach your child that electrical outlets can be dangerous.
  • Teach your child how to properly plug in and unplug an appliance, never by the cord.
  • Teach your child never to stick any object into an outlet.
  • Do not allow your child to play around substations, utility towers or pad-mounted transformers (green metal boxes) or where "Danger: High Voltage" signs are posted.
  • Make trees near power lines and poles holding utility wires off limits for climbing.
  • Have your child fly a kite in open spaces away from power lines.
  • Make sure your child only flies a kite in good weather.
  • Make sure your child's kite is made of wood, plastic or paper.
  • Do not allow your child to pull down a kite or anything else if it gets stuck on a power line or in a tree near a power line. The child should tell an adult who should contact Delmarva Power to retrieve it.
  • Teach your child to stay away from wires on the ground and to report the fallen wires to an adult.
  • Make sure your child comes inside during a thunderstorm.
  • Do not let your child swim during a thunderstorm.
  • Do not let your child play too close to utility poles.
  • Teach your child never to touch anything electrical with wet hands.

Kids 11-14

Teach your child:

  • To check for power lines before climbing a tree.
  • Never to climb a utility pole.
  • Never to touch or go near a fallen power line. The child should report it to an adult.
  • Never to play around substations, utility towers or pad-mounted transformers (green metal boxes) or where "Danger: High Voltage" signs are posted.
  • Never to enter a substation – not even to retrieve a toy.
  • To fly a kite in open spaces away from power lines.
  • To make a kite from wood, plastic or paper.
  • Never to pull down a kite or anything else if it gets stuck on a power line or in a tree near a power line. The child should tell an adult who should contact Delmarva Power to retrieve it.
  • To keep electric appliances at least 10 feet away from swimming pools.
  • Never to use electric appliances during a bath or shower, when standing near a sink or when standing in water.
  • Never to touch anything electrical with wet hands.
  • To come indoors during a thunderstorm.
  • Never to swim during a thunderstorm.
  • To call 911 for emergency help if someone is injured by electricity.
  • To stay away from wires on the ground and to report fallen wires to an adult.
  • To stay away from utility poles and power lines.
  • Never to throw things at utility poles or transmission towers.

Teens

Teach your child:

  • Never to throw anything over or at a power line, utility pole or transmission tower.
  • To check for power lines before using a ladder.
  • To check for power lines before climbing a tree or retrieving an item from the tree.
  • Never to climb a utility pole.
  • Never to go near or touch a fallen power line. The incident should be reported to an adult.
  • Never to hang out around substations, utility towers or transformers (green boxes) or where "Danger: High Voltage" signs are posted.
  • Never to enter a substation. No excuses!
  • To fly a kite in open spaces away from power lines.
  • To fly a kite only in good weather.
  • To make a kite from wood, plastic or paper.
  • Never to pull down a kite or anything else if it gets stuck on a power line or in a tree near a power line. The child should call Delmarva Power to retrieve it.
  • To keep electric appliances (i.e. radio) at least 10 feet away from swimming pools.
  • Never to use electric appliances during a bath or shower, when standing near a sink or when standing in water.
  • Never to touch anything electrical with wet hands.
  • To come indoors during a thunderstorm.
  • Never to swim during a thunderstorm.
  • If he/she can count 20 seconds or less between lightning and thunder, a thunderstorm is close enough to cause injury.
  • Never to pour water on an electrical fire. If the home does not have an appropriate extinguisher (class A,B,C), use flour or baking soda.
  • Never to overload outlets with too many plugs.
  • To use extension cords minimally.
  • To stay away from utility poles and power lines.